WAYS TO GIVE MENU

ZOOMINESCENCE

A FESTIVAL OF LIGHT.

We invite you and your company to be a part of the Edmonton Valley Zoo’s bold new direction by joining us as a sponsor of one of Edmonton’s most spectacular seasonal events, Zoominescence, a Festival of Light!

SPONSOR OPPORTUNITIES

ADOPT AN EXHIBIT

Did you know you can Adopt An Exhibit at the Edmonton Valley Zoo?

By adopting an exhibit — as an individual, as a gift, in memory of a loved one, or as a business — you encourage all patrons to become strong stewards for animal welfare and environmental conservation. Check out our many Exhibit adoption plans today!

ADOPT AN EXHIBIT
Valley Zoo Development Society : ADOPT AN ANIMAL SPECIAL

SPECTRUM OF SLOTHS

Looking for a great way to support the Edmonton Valley Zoo this Summer? Why not adopt a sweet little sloth?

ADOPT

NATURE'S WILD BACKYARD

The Valley Zoos next stage of revitalization, Nature’s Wild Backyard, strategically embraces play and discovery within the framing of immersive experiences as a means of intimately relating the visitor and a comprehensive ecology. Click here to learn more about this project, its current status, and how you can help make this next phase a reality.

PROJECT STATUS

THE ARCTIC FOX EXHIBIT

The Arctic Fox is known to be a quick-thinking, adaptable, and clever strategist. Did you know the Arctic Fox doesn’t hibernate during the winter? It is active year round, weathering the harshest of storms with ease. As fall progresses, the foxes thick fur changes from deep brown to snow white, enabling it to blend in with its surroundings and survive. The Arctic fox has such keen hearing that it can determine exactly where a small animal is moving under the snow. When it has located its prey, it pounces and punches through the snow with incredible precision.

Looking for the perfect way to show the City of Edmonton that your business is cunning, adaptable, and will be there for them no matter what life throws at them? Why not adopt the Arctic Fox as your “spirit animal!”

The Arctic Fox is listed under our “Small Carnivore” Exhibit Adoption Plan to the left. To see this plan, and other Exhibit Adoption Plans available, follow the link below.

ADOPTION AN EXHIBIT

“LEAF” A LEGACY

 
 

NATURE’S WILD BACKYARD

The Valley Zoo Development Society is committed to raising funds in support of the revitalization of the Edmonton Valley Zoo. Our most recent commitment is to raise over $9 million dollars to fund the the next phase of construction, Natures Wild Back Yard. We are confident that through donations from individuals, corporations, government, and private foundations, we will reach this goal.

If you would like to help, the “Ways to Give” menu located throughout our website is full of wonderful ways you can help the Valley Zoo Development Society raise funds and promote awareness to ensure the continued development of Edmonton’s beloved Valley Zoo. We sincerely thank you for your generosity.

Nature’s Wild Backyard will build on the Inner Zoo’s origins as the “Storyland Zoo” by rededicating it to children and young families. The design for Nature’s Wild Backyard is situated at the intersection of environmental stewardship and a child’s thirst for wonder through interaction. The design strategically embraces play and discovery within the framing of immersive experiences as a means of intimately relating the visitor and a comprehensive ecology. Laid out in a series of Zones, Nature’s Wild Backyard will allow our guests to experience each Zone in the same manner as the animals that inhabit it.

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OUR FUNDRAISING GOAL

LET’S CRUSH THE MYTHS

The Edmonton Valley Zoo is home to an Asian elephant named Lucy who has been the subject of great attention. Most of it comes from inflammatory and inaccurate campaigns by activists on the local, national, and international levels. We believe you deserve the facts on Lucy’s health and well-being.

Toggle through the myths below and get the facts. Then download your own copy of our “Crush the Myths” pamphlet and help us crush these myths for good!

DOWNLOAD

MYTH 1: THE EDMONTON VALLEY ZOO VIOLATES ZOO STANDARDS BY KEEPING LUCY ALONE.

FACT: The Edmonton Valley Zoo is inspected annually and meets all applicable regulatory and legislative standards, and codes of ethics of Canada’s Accredited Zoos and Aquariums. The agencies that license and regulate zoos in Alberta have also reviewed Lucy’s situation and have confirmed there are extenuating circumstances that must be considered for Lucy’s well-being.

MYTH 2: THE DECISION TO KEEP LUCY IN EDMONTON IS BECAUSE OF MONEY.

FACT: The Edmonton Valley Zoo puts the well-being and care of all the animals ahead of all else, and Lucy is no exception. Decisions will continue to be made in the best interest of Lucy’s health and well-being as she is an individual animal, with individual needs.

MYTH 3: LUCY HAS NEVER BEEN EXAMINED BY A THIRD-PARTY VETERINARIAN OR ELEPHANT EXPERT. THE ZOO IS PAYING VETS TO SAY LUCY CANNOT BE MOVED.

FACT: The Edmonton Valley Zoo routinely consults with international experts to ensure
Lucy receives excellent care. Many experts in the well-being of elephants who have examined Lucy have chosen not to lend their names to their findings due to harassment from animal rights activists.

MYTH 4: LUCY DOESN’T WALK ENOUGH.

FACT: Lucy goes for multiple long walks each day and follows a prescribed exercise program.
While research is still being evaluated, it is said that Asian elephants in the wild travel four to nine kilometers daily in search for food and water.

MYTH 5: LUCY WAS TAKEN FROM THE WILD AND HAS ALWAYS BEEN ISOLATED.

FACT: Lucy was orphaned in Sri Lanka and was brought to the Edmonton Valley Zoo via the Pinnewala Elephant Orphanage and Colombo Zoo. She is what is often called a “people elephant”, and her herd is her zoo family – the keepers and trainers who spend their days with Lucy. It is very special to witness the affection Lucy has for her caregivers. Lucy has had opportunities to socialize with both Asian and African elephants in the past, but these interactions demonstrated her lack of understanding of elephant
dynamics; she simply did not do well in these situations.

MYTH 6: SHE IS KEPT INDOORS, HAS LITTLE SPACE TO ROAM, AND IS CHAINED.

FACT: Lucy is rarely indoors and is often found enjoying the outdoors year-round. On the rare days she stays inside due to weather conditions, she follows an exercise program designed by an animal rehabilitation veterinarian. Lucy is not chained; she is free to walk around. On rare occasions, elephants may need to be restrained as a safety measure for all. This is a requirement of Canada’s Accredited Zoos and
Aquariums Association.

MYTH 7: SHE IS KEPT OUTSIDE IN FREEZING COLD WEATHER

FACT: When Lucy needs to be indoors due to cold weather she has a large heated building as well as a heated exercise barn. She does take walks daily even in the winter and her temperature and response to the weather are monitored closely by her caregivers during the walks.

MYTH 8: LUCY STANDS ON CONCRETE ALL DAY CAUSING SERIOUS FOOT PROBLEMS.

FACT: Lucy’s feet are in good condition. Her indoor enclosure floors are covered in rubber matting, sand or mulch to ease pressure on her feet. These floors are also heated. Lucy’s care team checks and conditions her feet daily as a preventative measure.

MYTH 9: LUCY IS OBESE.

FACT: Lucy’s weight is managed through her nutritional and exercise program. Her weight fluctuates but she is not considered obese.

MYTH 10: THE ZOO FEEDS LUCY A POOR DIET.

FACT: Lucy is on a nutrition plan recommended by an animal nutritionist and her veterinarian. The plan includes a variety of fresh browse, grass, herbivore pellets and hay.

MYTH 11: LUCY IS OLD AND SICK, WITH SERIOUS HEALTH PROBLEMS.

FACT: While Lucy is a well-adjusted elephant she does have some health issues that are managed well with her team at the Edmonton Valley Zoo. Her most significant health challenge is a respiratory problem that makes it difficult for her to breathe when she is in a stressful situation, such
as being transported or placed with unfamiliar caregivers.

MYTH 12: THE ZOO HASN’T DIAGNOSED OR TREATED LUCY’S RESPIRATORY PROBLEM.

FACT: Lucy has a respiratory problem due to a constriction of airway in her upper nasal region. Her breathing issue is managed when she is calm and comfortable. Under stress, Lucy’s ability to breathe is stretched almost beyond her capacity.